Red Planet
Forum for the anti-capitalist left.

Home » Forum » News & Current Events » International News (internationally significant news)
Show: Today's Messages :: Show Polls :: Message Navigator
Switch to threaded view of this topic Create a new topic Submit Reply
icon4.gif  International News [message #87] Sun, 20 January 2019 01:50 Go to next message
Comrade Luxemburg
Messages: 1
Registered: January 2019
post internationally significant news here. please be civil
  • Attachment: kp.png
    (Size: 4.72KB, Downloaded 105 times)

[Updated on: Sun, 20 January 2019 17:32] by Moderator

Report message to a moderator

Re: International News [message #173 is a reply to message #87] Mon, 28 January 2019 01:32 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Purged
Messages: 115
Registered: January 2019
Quote:
John Bolton Says Ultimate Goal In Venezuela Is To Take Their Oil
On Thursday, John Bolton told Fox Business host Trish Regan the administration had the goal of putting U.S. companies in charge of Venezuela's oil production. Because freedom!
https://crooksandliars.com/2019/01/john-bolton-says-ultimate -goal-venezuela
Re: International News [message #175 is a reply to message #173] Mon, 28 January 2019 10:36 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Camarade René
Messages: 14
Registered: January 2019
Purged wrote on Mon, 28 January 2019 01:32
Quote:
John Bolton Says Ultimate Goal In Venezuela Is To Take Their Oil
On Thursday, John Bolton told Fox Business host Trish Regan the administration had the goal of putting U.S. companies in charge of Venezuela's oil production. Because freedom!
https://crooksandliars.com/2019/01/john-bolton-says-ultimate -goal-venezuela
Holy shit they aren't even trying anymore.

https://itsgoingdown.org/portland-responds-with-solidarity-a fter-alt-right-attack-on-iww-hall/

I was at a rally Joey Gibson was at last year, what a fucking jackass. These altright morons don't even stop to think that maybe they should be propping up the Democrats as 'reasonable' to try to get people to funnel into the controlled opposition, but no they just lash out at anyone who doesn't walk around in a MAGA hat memeing about 1488. Attacking an IWW hall is the ultimate scumbag move, I'm in the IWW and all they do is try to take care of the poorest and most vulnerable. It's like attacking a church, except worse.
Re: International News [message #189 is a reply to message #175] Tue, 05 February 2019 16:04 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Purged
Messages: 115
Registered: January 2019
I want to share this article but when I tried to look at the page a second time it told me it was paywalled already.
I'm sorry if you can't see it

Quote:
Trump era could last 30 years
https://www.ft.com/content/debb6f2c-285c-11e9-a5ab-ff8ef2b97 6c7
Re: International News [message #194 is a reply to message #189] Tue, 05 February 2019 19:32 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Purged
Messages: 115
Registered: January 2019
Got the article
Quote:


How long is this going to last? Ever since the twin political upheavals of 2016 -- Britain's vote for Brexit and America's election of Donald Trump -- analysts have argued about whether this a temporary aberration, or the beginning of a new era.

It is still early days. But it already seems likely that future historians will look upon the events of 2016 as marking the beginning of a new cycle in international history. The bad news for anguished liberals is that these cycles can last quite a long time -- 30 years seems to be about average.

In the years since "Brexit-and-Trump", a global populist movement has gathered momentum. The fact that Mr Trump is despised by much of the western establishment and media can obscure this point. But the US president has many admirers, some of them running governments around the world.

Jair Bolsonaro, the new president of Brazil, Latin America's largest country, is an avowed Trump fan. In the Middle East, the Saudi and Israeli governments much prefer Mr Trump to Barack Obama, his predecessor. His fan club also extends into Europe. The governments of Poland and Hungary are closer ideologically to the Trump White House than to the European Commission in Brussels. Matteo Salvini, the deputy prime minister of Italy (and the country's most powerful man), also sees Mr Trump as a role model.

The horror show of Brexit means that there are few other European populist parties currently campaigning to leave the EU. But the anti-establishment impulse that gave rise to the Brexit vote is still gathering strength in Europe. It has found expression in diverse forms, from the gilets jaunes movement in France to the rise of the Alternative for Germany party, which is now the official opposition in the German parliament.

Past precedent suggests that if a "populist era" takes hold, it might last as long as three decades. All efforts at historical periodisation are slightly artificial. But it is possible to identify two distinct eras in postwar western politics, both of which lasted roughly 30 years. The period from 1945-1975, known as les trente glorieuses in France, was identified with a period of strong economic growth across the west, alongside the construction of welfare states and Keynesian demand-management -- all played out against the international backdrop of the cold war.

By the mid-1970s, this model had run into trouble in the Anglo-American world, with Britain suffering from "stagflation" and President Jimmy Carter diagnosing a national "malaise" in the US. A new era (often termed "neoliberal" by its critics) began in 1979 with the election of Margaret Thatcher in Britain, followed by Ronald Reagan in the US in 1980.

In retrospect, this was also part of a global shift. In 1978, Deng Xiaoping came to power in China and initiated a policy of market-based "reform and opening-up". The communist bloc in Europe also began to crack with the formation of the Solidarity trade union in Poland in September 1980. The foundations of a globalised capitalist economy were emerging.

This "neoliberal era" also lasted roughly 30 years until it was discredited by the global financial crisis of 2008. As with the end of the trente glorieuses, it took a few years of uncertainty before a new ideological movement emerged. But that happened in 2016, with Mr Trump's election and Brexit.

But why should cycles in modern history last for roughly 30 years? One possible explanation is that the successful ideologies and the political movements they spawn go through a cycle of emulation followed by overshoot.

If new movements or politicians develop an aura of success, they find imitators around the world. That sense of ideological momentum then creates a demand for the original ideas behind the movement to be pushed further and faster. And that leads to the over-reach phase of the cycle. An example of ideological over-reach is the way in which the Reaganite demand for lower taxes and less red tape eventually led to the excessive deregulation of finance, culminating in the financial crisis.

The fact that populist and nationalist parties around the world are already taking their cue from Mr Trump suggests that the cycle of emulation is already well under way. It is now standard practice for politicians, such as Viktor Orban in Hungary, as well as Messrs Salvini and Bolsonaro, to imitate the Trump playbook -- condemning "globalism", accusing the media of spreading fake news, mocking the "politically correct", and scorning international organisations that attempt to deal with problems such as climate change or the resettlement of refugees.

The rapid spread of this new political style could be just the beginning of a new era that lasts decades. But there is one major qualification to this idea, that distressed liberals should hang on to. If the period of emulation and intensification is to last, the populist movement needs more than electoral success. It also needs to point to results in the real world. The trente glorieuses were deemed glorious because living standards were visibly rising across the west. In the same way, the Reagan-Thatcher era was solidified by renewed economic growth and victory in the cold war.

By contrast, Brexit is in deep trouble and the Trump administration is floundering. Unless populists can deliver tangible results, their new era could yet die in its infancy.
Re: International News [message #197 is a reply to message #194] Fri, 08 February 2019 00:03 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Redwell
Messages: 1
Registered: January 2019
https:[REMOVE ME]//www.economist.com/middle-east-and-africa/2019/02/09/a-p olitical-union-for-east-africa

A political union for east Africa?

Africa's regional institutions do not lack ambition. The African Union's master plan promises a rich, peaceful continent criss-crossed by high-speed trains. Eventually. Its target is 2063, a date well past the likely retirement date of all the bigwigs who signed the plan.

The East African Community (eac), by contrast, has no time to waste. It wants to form a single currency by 2024. At a recent summit, heads of state discussed drafting an east African constitution, with the ultimate goal of political federation. The eac is the most successful of Africa's regional blocs. Since its revival in 2000 it has established a customs union and the rudiments of a common market. But its leaders are getting ahead of themselves: deepening rifts have put the project in jeopardy.

Four of its six members (Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda and South Sudan) are led by ex-rebels, some with competing interests in the Congolese borderlands to the west. The recent summit was postponed twice because Burundi, which has fallen out with Rwanda, refused to attend. That quarrel goes beyond mere words. In 2015 Pierre Nkurunziza, the Burundian president, fought off a coup. His government accuses Rwanda of backing it. In 2016 un experts reported that Burundian refugees were being recruited to fight against their home government. In December the same experts said that arms and men were also flowing through Burundi to undermine Rwanda.

Rwanda's president, Paul Kagame, is also on bad terms with Yoweri Museveni, his Ugandan counterpart. The rift is personal. Mr Museveni fought his way to power in the 1980s with the help of Rwandan refugees; Mr Kagame, who grew up in a Ugandan refugee camp, was his military intelligence chief. Later, as presidents, the former comrades launched two wars in Congo, then fell out over the loot. By 2000 their soldiers were firing at each other, 600km from home.

Relations are again dicey. Last year Mr Museveni sacked his police chief, who was later charged by an army court with aiding the kidnap of Rwandan exiles (among other things). The abductees, including one of Mr Kagame's former guards, had been illegally sent back to Rwanda and imprisoned.

Rivalry between Kenya and Tanzania, the two largest members, is more straightforward. Together they account for three-fifths of the region's population and three-quarters of its gdp. Yet commerce between them is hobbled by a trade war. Although both are meant to be in a common market, Tanzania has imposed tariffs on Kenyan sweets. Kenya has retaliated by taxing Tanzanian flour. Tanzania, which is sliding towards protectionism, also objects to a proposed trade deal between the eac and the eu, which Kenya is keen on. As the only eac countries with coastlines, both vie for investment in infrastructure: in 2016 Uganda decided to route an oil pipeline through Tanzania, to Kenya's chagrin.

Some worry that the escalating tensions could cause history to repeat itself. The first East African Community collapsed in 1977. More likely, the region will continue to make faltering progress on trade, where the spread of cross-border business creates its own momentum. But political issues are trickier. Leaders who brook no dissent at home have little taste for compromise abroad. Each wants integration, as long as he is in charge.
Re: International News [message #270 is a reply to message #197] Tue, 19 February 2019 11:59 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Mazdak
Messages: 5
Registered: January 2019
Location: leftpol

Left-wing opposition in Haiti headed by the 'Platfom Pitit Desalin' party have organised and national general strike along with protests against the president of Haiti for misusing $3.8 billion worth of loans from the Venezuelan government. Nine people have been killed and many more have been injured as the leader of the Pitit Desalin party has declared interest in establishing a transitional government.
Re: International News [message #271 is a reply to message #270] Tue, 19 February 2019 16:28 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Purged
Messages: 115
Registered: January 2019
Holy shit is Mazdak, I have't seen you in a while
These are the links I suppose you posted on /netcom/ to the same news
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-47193837
https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/02/death-toll-rises-hait i-protest-crackdown-190214174428945.html
https://www.dw.com/en/haiti-thousands-protest-against-corrup tion/a-47421473
https://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas /haiti/article226176555.html
Re: International News [message #320 is a reply to message #87] Fri, 15 March 2019 06:09 Go to previous message
Pato
Messages: 17
Registered: January 2019
A terrorist who announced themselves on /pol/ killed like 40 people
Link: https://www.townsvillebulletin.com.au/police-respond-to-shoo ting-inside-christchurch-mosque/news-story/db75a7aa031b8db06 8ca7c7e44c4728e
His manifesto: https://www.scribd.com/document/401941994/NEW-ZEALAND-SHOOTE R-S-MANIFESTO
Edit: it looks like the manifesto link is no longer working, here is a pastebin link pulled from 4chan https://pastebin.com/bzZyMduP

[Updated on: Fri, 15 March 2019 06:57]

Report message to a moderator

  Switch to threaded view of this topic Create a new topic Submit Reply
Previous Topic: Netanyahu wins 2019 Israeli legislative election
Goto Forum:
  

-=] Back to Top [=-
[ Syndicate this forum (XML) ] [ RSS ] [ PDF ]

Current Time: Sun Aug 18 19:14:46 UTC 2019

Total time taken to generate the page: 0.05308 seconds